The answers to this question are pretty funny, and also fairly informative!

mathematica:

Howdy, everyone! Tonight we’re rolling out Mathemedia, a compendium of math-related media — and we’re looking for your submissions!
Send us your favorite books, movies, songs, art, essays, and articles (etc.) that prominently feature mathematics or mathematicians — and we’ll add them to Mathemedia. But first! a few ground rules:
We prefer that material be accessible to anyone with a love of mathematics and access to Wikipedia — assuming, at most, a typical high school education in math.
In general, we’re looking for stories about mathematics — told either from the inside or outside. Fiction is great; non-fiction is good too, as long as it’s designed for more than a mathematically-trained audience. There are several great lists out there on the interwebs of seminal papers and great textbooks and phenomenal websites — this is not one of them.
If you have the time, please include a short description of the book, movie, etc. in question. This will help anyone browsing the list figure out what’s most interesting and appealing to them. If the material is legally available on the Internet (e.g., an article or music video), feel free to include a link!
Thanks for helping spread our love of math! We’ll start putting up what you submit later tonight.
This list was inspired by math-is-beautiful's fabulous list of math-related blogs :)

Updated (finally)! Take a look and let us know if we’re missing anything!

mathematica:

Howdy, everyone! Tonight we’re rolling out Mathemedia, a compendium of math-related media — and we’re looking for your submissions!

Send us your favorite books, movies, songs, art, essays, and articles (etc.) that prominently feature mathematics or mathematicians — and we’ll add them to Mathemedia. But first! a few ground rules:

  1. We prefer that material be accessible to anyone with a love of mathematics and access to Wikipedia — assuming, at most, a typical high school education in math.
  2. In general, we’re looking for stories about mathematics — told either from the inside or outside. Fiction is great; non-fiction is good too, as long as it’s designed for more than a mathematically-trained audience. There are several great lists out there on the interwebs of seminal papers and great textbooks and phenomenal websites — this is not one of them.
  3. If you have the time, please include a short description of the book, movie, etc. in question. This will help anyone browsing the list figure out what’s most interesting and appealing to them. If the material is legally available on the Internet (e.g., an article or music video), feel free to include a link!

Thanks for helping spread our love of math! We’ll start putting up what you submit later tonight.

This list was inspired by math-is-beautiful's fabulous list of math-related blogs :)

Updated (finally)! Take a look and let us know if we’re missing anything!

genderoftheday:

Today’s Gender of the Day is: Bertrand Russell and Alfred North Whitehead Proving That 1+1=2 

genderoftheday:

Today’s Gender of the Day is: Bertrand Russell and Alfred North Whitehead Proving That 1+1=2 

ryanandmath:

Imagine you wanted to measure the coastline of Great Britain. You might remember from calculus that straight lines can make a pretty good approximation of curves, so you decide that you’re going to estimate the length of the coast using straight lines of the length of 100km (not a very good estimate, but it’s a start). You finish, and you come up with a total costal length of 2800km. And you’re pretty happy. Now, you have a friend who also for some reason wants to measure the length of the coast of Great Britain. And she goes out and measures, but this time using straight lines of the length 50km and comes up with a total costal length of 3400km. Hold up! How can she have gotten such a dramatically different number?

It turns out that due to the fractal-like nature of the coast of Great Britain, the smaller the measurement that is used, the larger the coastline length will be become. Empirically, if we started to make the measurements smaller and smaller, the coastal length will increase without limit. This is a problem! And this problem is known as the coastline paradox.

By how fractals are defined, straight lines actually do not provide as much information about them as they do with other “nicer” curves. What is interesting though is that while the length of the curve may be impossible to measure, the area it encloses does converge to some value, as demonstrated by the Sierpinski curve, pictured above. For this reason, while it is a difficult reason to talk about how long the coastline of a country may be, it is still possible to get a good estimate of the total land mass that the country occupies. This phenomena was studied in detail by Benoit Mandelbrot in his paper “How Long is the Coast of Britain" and motivated many of connections between nature and fractals in his later work.

mindfuckmath:

Will Prime Numbers (@_primes_) tweet the final prime number with 140 digits before the heat death of the universe?
Prime Numbers (@_primes_) is a Twitter feed that tweets successive prime numbers on an hourly basis. As we know, tweets are limited to 140 characters and the number of prime numbers extend infinitely beyond 140 digits.  So how long will it take @_primes_ to reach the final prime number with 140 digits, thus ending its awesome yet tedious mathematical mission? More importantly, will it reach that final tweet before the heat death of the universe in roughly 10^100 years?  As it says on the homepage of @_primes_: 
Every prime number, eventually. (Or the heat death of the universe; whichever happens first.)
Let’s start by finding out what the final prime number with 140 digits is. A quick search on WolframAlpha reveals that this is a number of 139 consecutive 9s and a 7, which is just 3 shy of 10^140.  Next, we want to figure out the approximate number of prime numbers between 0 and 10^140 or π*(10^140) which is equal to the number of hours needed. Using the prime number theorem, which is: 
π (N) ~ N/ln N 
or, our number (10^140) divided by the natural logarithm of our number (322.36191302) is equal to the approximate number of prime numbers between 0 and 10^140. We plug in our numbers and get:
π (10^140) ~ 10^140/322.36191302
π (10^140) ~ 3.10210… × 10^137
Therefore, when we factor in the primes that have already been tweeted (@_primes_ is currently on 5 digit primes, which barely scratches the surface) that final tweet will take a little less than 3.10210… × 10^137 hours.  So what’s that in years?  Well, there are 8760 hours in a year and when we divide our number of hours (3.10210… × 10^137) by 8760 we get 3.54121… × 10^133 years.  This is significantly longer than the 10^100 years until the end of everything.  As long as @_primes_ is able to tweet on an hourly basis until the heat death of the universe, it will still be a long ways away from reaching its final tweet. 
* Note that π here is not referring to the mathematical constant of 3.14… rather it signifies the number of prime numbers below or at the number given.  

mindfuckmath:

Will Prime Numbers (@_primes_) tweet the final prime number with 140 digits before the heat death of the universe?

Prime Numbers (@_primes_) is a Twitter feed that tweets successive prime numbers on an hourly basis. As we know, tweets are limited to 140 characters and the number of prime numbers extend infinitely beyond 140 digits.  So how long will it take @_primes_ to reach the final prime number with 140 digits, thus ending its awesome yet tedious mathematical mission? More importantly, will it reach that final tweet before the heat death of the universe in roughly 10^100 years?  As it says on the homepage of @_primes_: 

Every prime number, eventually. (Or the heat death of the universe; whichever happens first.)

Let’s start by finding out what the final prime number with 140 digits is. A quick search on WolframAlpha reveals that this is a number of 139 consecutive 9s and a 7, which is just 3 shy of 10^140.  Next, we want to figure out the approximate number of prime numbers between 0 and 10^140 or π*(10^140) which is equal to the number of hours needed. Using the prime number theorem, which is: 

π (N) ~ N/ln N 

or, our number (10^140) divided by the natural logarithm of our number (322.36191302) is equal to the approximate number of prime numbers between 0 and 10^140. We plug in our numbers and get:

π (10^140) ~ 10^140/322.36191302

π (10^140) ~ 3.10210… × 10^137

Therefore, when we factor in the primes that have already been tweeted (@_primes_ is currently on 5 digit primes, which barely scratches the surface) that final tweet will take a little less than 3.10210… × 10^137 hours.  So what’s that in years?  Well, there are 8760 hours in a year and when we divide our number of hours (3.10210… × 10^137) by 8760 we get 3.54121… × 10^133 years.  This is significantly longer than the 10^100 years until the end of everything.  As long as @_primes_ is able to tweet on an hourly basis until the heat death of the universe, it will still be a long ways away from reaching its final tweet. 

* Note that π here is not referring to the mathematical constant of 3.14… rather it signifies the number of prime numbers below or at the number given.  

mindfuckmath:

What Is an Example of a Counterintuitive Mathematical Result?
The Hydra Game will always lead to a result that you probably wouldn’t expect.  

This is an aptly named blog. Check out all the answers to this question on Quora for more counterintuitive results!

mindfuckmath:

What Is an Example of a Counterintuitive Mathematical Result?

The Hydra Game will always lead to a result that you probably wouldn’t expect.  

This is an aptly named blog. Check out all the answers to this question on Quora for more counterintuitive results!

"The infinite is nowhere to be found in reality. It neither exists in nature nor provides a legitimate basis for rational thought… The role that remains for the infinite to play is solely that of an idea."

David Hilbert, “On the Infinite.” (via awarenessism)

"Another roof, another proof."

Paul Erdös’ motto, roaming the world as other mathematicians’ guest (via curiosamathematica)

"I don’t think that everyone should become a mathematician, but I do believe that many students don’t give mathematics a real chance. I did poorly in math for a couple of years in middle school; I was just not interested in thinking about it.
I can see that without being excited mathematics can look pointless and cold. The beauty of mathematics only shows itself to more patient followers."

Interview with Maryam Mirzakhani, the brilliant Iranian mathematician who was the first woman to win the Fields Medal (via curiosamathematica)