theapocalypticalgorithm:

Mesmerizing Interiors Of Iran’s Mosques Captured In Rare Photographs By Mohammad Domiri
Mohammad Domiri, a talented architectural photographer from northern Iran, takes stunning photos of grandiose mosque architecture throughout the Middle East.
Middle Eastern architecture is often recognized by its elegantly curved arches and spiraling columns, which feature heavily throughout Domiri’s photos. Many of the historic sites Domiri shoots are decorated with colorful stained-glass windows, geometric decorations and painstakingly detailed mosaics, so he shoots with special wide-angle lenses to make sure that he captures all of these details. Because they are historic structures, many of these mosques also impose heavy restrictions on photography – making photos like Domiri’s very rare.

theapocalypticalgorithm:

Mesmerizing Interiors Of Iran’s Mosques Captured In Rare Photographs By Mohammad Domiri

Mohammad Domiri, a talented architectural photographer from northern Iran, takes stunning photos of grandiose mosque architecture throughout the Middle East.

Middle Eastern architecture is often recognized by its elegantly curved arches and spiraling columns, which feature heavily throughout Domiri’s photos. Many of the historic sites Domiri shoots are decorated with colorful stained-glass windows, geometric decorations and painstakingly detailed mosaics, so he shoots with special wide-angle lenses to make sure that he captures all of these details. Because they are historic structures, many of these mosques also impose heavy restrictions on photography – making photos like Domiri’s very rare.

mindfuckmath:

Awesome video by ViHart on why transcendental numbers dominate the real number line.  

mindfuckmath:

What is Graham’s Number? (feat Ron Graham)

Graham’s number explained by none other than the man who first imagined this unimaginably big number, Ron Graham.  Make sure to also watch the companion video How Big is Graham’s Number?

mindfuckmath:

The Goldbach Conjecture
The Goldbach Conjecture states that every even number greater than two is the sum of two prime numbers. This cool diagram demonstrates this for every even number from four to fifty.  The conjecture was first proposed in 1742 and while it is widely considered to be true, it has yet to be proven.

mindfuckmath:

The Goldbach Conjecture

The Goldbach Conjecture states that every even number greater than two is the sum of two prime numbers. This cool diagram demonstrates this for every even number from four to fifty.  The conjecture was first proposed in 1742 and while it is widely considered to be true, it has yet to be proven.

Yesterday, two of my friends and I finally went to the National Museum of Mathematics — MoMATH — downtown in Manhattan, New York. MoMATH is located across 26th Street from Madison Square Park, and after yesterday, I’d definitely recommend it to anyone, regardless of age or experience with math. I had a lot of fun, and I absolutely think my knowledge of mathematics enhanced, not diminished, my appreciation for museum content.

In my mind, there are a number of reasons why MoMATH is important, and why it should be a cornerstone of any trip to New York:

  1. I’m a huge fan of museums of science, but I think it’s a good thing to have a museum just for mathematics. There is something unique to mathematics, a certain drive towards understanding beyond the world, that an appreciation for science, in all its glory, cannot muster.
  2. MoMATH in particular is engineered in a way that’s accessible to people of all ages. The activities and exhibits themselves are clearly designed for children — with the exception of the art exhibit Composite, which is clearly designed for a more critical audience, and the “puzzle cafe,” for which adult patience and/or guidance is essential — but each has a nearby computer display with an easy-to-understand explanation including more advanced mathematics.
  3. People, especially young children, deserve the chance to experience math in the right way — by exploring patterns and structure in the world for themselves, not by learning arithmetic by rote. And if that experience can’t be effected in the classroom just yet, what better place than a museum dedicated to generating it?

[CJH]

Have any of you guys been to MoMATH? What’d you think? How about anyone who hasn’t been yet — what are your thoughts? Do you think mathematics is something you can capture, at least in part, in a museum?

mindfuckmath:

Map of Mathematistan
I love how the houses in ARITHMETICS are arranged according to the Fibonacci sequence.

mindfuckmath:

Map of Mathematistan

I love how the houses in ARITHMETICS are arranged according to the Fibonacci sequence.

A 2012 study comparing 16-to-65-year-olds in 20 countries found that Americans rank in the bottom five in numeracy. On a scale of 1 to 5, 29 percent of them scored at Level 1 or below, meaning they could do basic arithmetic but not computations requiring two or more steps. One study that examined medical prescriptions gone awry found that 17 percent of errors were caused by math mistakes on the part of doctors or pharmacists. A survey found that three-quarters of doctors inaccurately estimated the rates of death and major complications associated with common medical procedures, even in their own specialty areas. 

"One of the most vivid arithmetic failings displayed by Americans occurred in the early 1980s, when the A&W restaurant chain released a new hamburger to rival the McDonald’s Quarter Pounder. With a third-pound of beef, the A&W burger had more meat than the Quarter Pounder; in taste tests, customers preferred A&W’s burger. And it was less expensive. A lavish A&W television and radio marketing campaign cited these benefits. Yet instead of leaping at the great value, customers snubbed it.

"Only when the company held customer focus groups did it become clear why. The Third Pounder presented the American public with a test in fractions. And we failed. Misunderstanding the value of one-third, customers believed they were being overcharged. Why, they asked the researchers, should they pay the same amount for a third of a pound of meat as they did for a quarter-pound of meat at McDonald’s. The “4” in “¼,” larger than the “3” in “⅓,” led them astray

"To cure our innumeracy, we will have to accept that the traditional approach we take to teaching math — the one that can be mind-numbing, but also comfortingly familiar — does not work. We will have to come to see math not as a list of rules to be memorized but as a way of looking at the world that really makes sense."